fucktonofanatomyreferences:

A delightful fuck-ton of mermaid anatomy references.

A bit of a talk-through; Consider how natural swimming is to mermaids/men. When swimming, they often won’t be utilizing their hands and arms to help them move forward, ‘cause they’re adept to using their tails and want to keep their arms free for multitasking. Of course there are situations where it’s required, like when fighting currents and twisting around. Because they’re swimming on a horizontal, their heads will be turned upward, just like if we humans were standing vertically looking up to the sky. Mer-peoples’ chests are often puffed outward, because the arms are typically pulled back behind them (just like when humans are told to “sit up straight and show good posture” by rolling the shoulders back). Do keep in mind that the GIFs above don’t show full tail movement, as human legs don’t bend outward; mer-tails will be like the side-to-side fish swimming motion, but flipped to the side (if that made any goddamn sense). Don’t forget they’ll be breathing underwater (and maybe on land, depending if you want to grant them that ability)! Are you giving ’em gills, or are the human lungs somehow acclimatized to breathing water? Think about whether you’re designing a mermaid for practicality or aesthetics; if it’s gonna be practical, their hair will more than likely be cut short or tied up, ‘cause, though swimming with long hair isn’t too difficult, it tangles wicked easily and can impede sight (in the ocean, a mere second can cost you). Of course we all like the long flowing hair (I do too), but that’s just something to think about. (Be aware that good haircuts on land might not be good underwater, and vice versa. Consider how the water will affect the hair movement.) And designing the fins, too. Think about whether you’re splicing them with another sea creature or if they’re a new design entirely. Think about how you want them to swim and how the fins will help that work. Also, depending on how “cultured” you want ‘em to be, they probably won’t be wearing clothing, because no other creature under the sea does. But, then again, they’ve been in contact with humans (otherwise there would be no myths and rumours), so maybe they took after us. Who knows. Just food for thought. (Merpeople can be creepy as fuck, too; they don’t have to be these gentle maidens.) And of course, there’s the reproductive/excretive system. If we assume mermaids take after whales, the genitalia will be just about ”mid-shin” level in front. Some people put it at the end of the tail (between the two fins), and some make the fish half disappear slightly at the waist to expose “human” genitalia. You can get creative with it, since they’re mythical creatures. Maybe their belly-buttons are also anuses. Who really knows. “What about merman genitalia?” Look up “male whale genitalia” on Google, or “male fish genitalia.” That might help.

image

image

[From various sources]

(via fixyourwritinghabits)

clevergirlhelps:

Reference
Dive reflex
Mermaid anatomy
Mythology
Facts and Legends
Types, types 2, types 3
Symbolism and History
Mermaids
Mockumentary, mockumentary whole
Species. Most agree merpeople are some strange mix of mammal and fish. You should probably determine to what extent merpeople are one or the other.
Fish. Fish have gills to help them take oxygen from the water. Some fish (like beta fish and arapaima) also need oxygen from the air; these fish usually live in freshwater. A fish’s tail moves in a side-to-side manner. Fish have extra fins to help them maneuver. Fish are cold-blooded and covered in scales, which protect them and can provide camouflage.
Mammal. Dolphin-like mammals (cetaceans) are totally dependent on air for oxygen. Their tails move in a up-and-down manner and have a different fin orientation. Cetaceans communicate and navigate via echolocation. They are warm-blooded. Cetaceans have hairless skin that easily scars. I used cetaceans for this post, because that is what many merpeople are based off, but you can also use mammals like otters, pinnipeds (see selkies), manatees, and dugongs. 
Read More

clevergirlhelps:

Reference

Species. Most agree merpeople are some strange mix of mammal and fish. You should probably determine to what extent merpeople are one or the other.

  • Fish. Fish have gills to help them take oxygen from the water. Some fish (like beta fish and arapaima) also need oxygen from the air; these fish usually live in freshwater. A fish’s tail moves in a side-to-side manner. Fish have extra fins to help them maneuver. Fish are cold-blooded and covered in scales, which protect them and can provide camouflage.
  • Mammal. Dolphin-like mammals (cetaceans) are totally dependent on air for oxygen. Their tails move in a up-and-down manner and have a different fin orientation. Cetaceans communicate and navigate via echolocation. They are warm-blooded. Cetaceans have hairless skin that easily scars. I used cetaceans for this post, because that is what many merpeople are based off, but you can also use mammals like otterspinnipeds (see selkies), manatees, and dugongs

Read More

(via fixyourwritinghabits)

Filipino Mythology, Ghost Stories, Folktales and Superstitions

shackleboltrps:

Because Filipino stories are scary and just yes.

Filipino Mythological Creatures

Filipino Ghost Stories

Dimensions vs. Parallel Universes

writeworld:

Anonymous asked: Hello! I have a question concerning dimensions. I am writing a story where I include a character going from one dimension to another. Though my knowledge of dimensions is pretty limited. Do you have any reliable sources (whether it be in book form or online)…

13 quick tips when you're starting your novel

keyboardsmashwriters:

  • Wind down. The stress of the day stays in your system until you give yourself time to detox. Do something relaxing, even if that means scrolling a few pages on your dash – but be careful, because Tumblr and other social media sites are time thieves. Two hours later,…

Writing Research - Victorian Era

ghostflowerdreams:

In historical fiction it is important to be accurate and the only way to do so is to research the era. What is highly recommended by many writers is to write your story first. While writing your story, mark the parts that you’re not sure are correct and then do the…

"So You Want To Work With Autistic Kids" Primer

girljanitor:

jack-not-jacque:

Hi everyone, so I made a post a few days ago about putting together a list of links for my lab partner, who wants to work with autistic children. This is what I’ve come up with. Admittedly it’s more of an “introduction to neurodiversity advocacy” primer,…

Anonymous said: I'm more interested in reading and editing but do you have any links/sources/anything which might help get me started? I'd love to take on some editing assignments and work on a lit magazine.

thewritershelpers:

Our editing tag

Rewriting

Editing your work

25 ways to edit the suck out of your novel

Time to revise

Editing checklist

What is editing

Editing tips for fuckups

Anonymous said: Hi, I'm writing a character who is asexual. How do I convey this accurately and respectfully, without it just being that there simply isn't a romance plot surrounding her?

fixyourwritinghabits:

Anonymous said: Hi! I was just wondering if you could help me find some research on precognition and clairvoyance?

fantasticalwriting:

Precognition:

Feeling The Future: Is Precognition Possible?

Precognition (superpowerwiki)

Popular Precognition Books (Goodreads)

Definition

Precognition in the TV show Heroes

What is Precognition?

Clairvoyance:

Clairvoyance (wikipedia)

Definition

Popular Clairvoyance Books (Goodreads)

Clairvoyance (superpowerwiki)

I usually don’t do others research, but I had little to do and I was in a good mood :)

Guide: Medieval Monarchy

clevergirlhelps:

writing-questions-answered:

Anonymous said: any tips on creating a fictional town in america? I went through the settings tag and couldn't find much

thewritingcafe:

Pick a Region: (Italicized states could fit into more than one group, depending on who you ask, and some people list more or less regions than the ones listed below)

  • Northeast: New York, Vermont, Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Jersey
  • Midwest: Indiana, Ohio, Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan, Minnesota, Iowa, Missouri, Kansas, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, Oklahoma
  • Southwest: Arizona, New Mexico, Texas, Nevada
  • South: Texas, Alabama, Kentucky, North Carolina, South Carolina, Florida, Georgia, Virginia, West Virginia, Tennessee, Mississippi, Maryland, Delaware, Louisiana, Arkansas, 
  • West: California, Oregon, Washington, Wyoming, Idaho, Colorado, Utah, Nevada, Montana
  • Non-Contiguous: Alaska, Hawaii

Once you’ve got your region, narrow it down by state. You don’t have to get more specific than that if you don’t want to, but your character’s world will give away what region they’re in and possibly the state based on clues. Here is what you should know when creating your fictional town in a region/state:

  • Environment: Know the environment of your region or state. There are no wolves (except for isolated incidents) in areas like the lower Midwest, so it would be odd for your characters to come across a pack of wolves in a southern Wisconsin forest.
  • Climate: There are tons of different climates around the US. If the area of your town is specific (like how South Park is a mountain town in Colorado), you’ll need to know more about that climate. If your characters are in a temperate region, you just need the seasons to change depending on the timeline of your story. If your characters live in a region where heavy snowfall is common, snow days at school will be rare.
  • Culture: Slang, common religions, architecture, food, popular music, references (to nearby cities, sports teams, etc.), etc. vary by region, by state, and by city. Some slang is only found in certain cities or certain regions of a state.

Type of Town:

  • Rural: Rural towns are found in the countryside, often with low populations. 
  • Suburban-Rural: These are a mix of suburbia and the countryside. Houses may be placed farther apart, the town might be larger than a suburb without having a larger population, and there may be small businesses.
  • Suburban: Suburbs are just outside cities and large towns and are primarily residential, meaning there are not a lot of businesses. In the US, it’s typical for suburbs to have single-family homes (though there are multi-family homes sometimes), sidewalks, and gaps between houses. Suburbs are a favorite for authors, especially YA authors.
  • Suburban-Urban: These are between the “true” suburbs and the city, often sitting on the border of the city. They have residential areas, but also everything you might find in a city such as busy streets, public transportation, several businesses, and buildings. You’re more likely to find multi-family homes and apartment buildings in suburban-urban towns than you are with suburban homes.
  • Urban: Urban towns aren’t necessarily in the heart of the city (the main tourist areas). Urban neighborhoods, towns, villages, etc., vary greatly by city and each one has its own unique culture and demographics, especially if there is a large population of immigrants in the area. Some urban towns can resemble suburban towns.

When you’ve got your town, draw a map for it. Note important places, like schools and the homes of characters. If your characters are in a suburb or a suburb-urban town, pick either a real city or a fictional city in a real state to put it around.

If your characters are in school and you want a lot of characters, pick an urban, suburban-urban, or suburban town. For the last one you can have more than one suburb share a school. If your character works at a place like a major law firm, they’ll probably need to be near a city. Think about what your character needs to pick a town.

Other:

  • Name: If you know what region your town is set in, look at the names of real towns around that area. They usually follow a pattern. The name of the town can be the name of schools, businesses, streets, and parks too.
  • History: If needed, come up with a history for your town. You might not think you need it at first, but it can come in handy. For example, if you need your characters to be at an event, there can be a party for the town’s 100th birthday. The age of the town might also determine the architecture.
  • Appearance: In the town I grew up on, every property had at least one (big) tree on the front lawn thus creating an arch of branches and leaves over every residential street in the summer. What does your town look like? Are there boulevards? Parks? Fences? Alleys? Driveways? Streetlights? Public transportation? Tall houses? Wide houses? Large properties? Small properties? Is it hilly or flat? While there may be a combination of all of these things, certain traits may be more dominant or typical.
  • Activities: What is there to do in your town? Is there a popular hangout? Is there a beach nearby? Do people go to a nearby city for fun? Are there certain areas within the environment (cliffs, clearings in a forest, a lake, etc.) that are popular hangout spots?
  • Keep track of all facts: Write down everything about your town so that you don’t end up with inconsistencies. Keep a list of schools, businesses, public places, government buildings, and everything else that is relevant.

Your town has to be realistic. Readers should have an idea of where this town is or what is near it. A suburban town in the middle of nowhere with no mention of where it is and varying ecosystems isn’t realistic. It’s surreal, distant, and might only work in certain fantasy genres. A town with a population of 15,000 people, but with four middle schools, two churches, a mosque, a synagogue, two law firms, no variation in economic or social class, eight restaurants, and a car dealership is unrealistic unless this small town is used as a center for several other towns.

http://fixyourwritinghabits.tumblr.com/post/82628809563/romanovhistory-massive-writing-resource

Guide: Post-Apocalyptic Pregnancy, Childbirth, and Parenting

writing-questions-answered:

Anonymous asked: My story takes place during a time where society crumbles from a virus and some radiation from bombs. I was wondering if it’s possible for babies to live and grow up in such a world. It’s impossible to find pain medication and so the woman would…